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What are some problems that you can face on Mt. Everest?

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What are some problems that you can face on Mt. Everest?
Like crevases, avalanches and stuff?
I have to write an adventure novel on Everest for english and I need some things that could go wrong ans solutions.
I dont have any ideas write now.
Also how many sherpas do you need per person to climb everest? I cant find the answer anywhere.
Thankyou for your help
asked Aug 19, 2013 in Culture by pance (50,970 points)

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- Crevasses
- Avalanches
- Hypothermia
- Hyperventilation from over-exertion (which will cause you to use up the oxygen in your cannister at an excelerated rate. This is very dangerous, as when you summit, you NEED that oxygen in order to avoid hypoxia)
- Hypoxia (lack of oxygen to the system) and black-out or death as a result
- Frostbite
- Broken bones (in which case, you're on your own...mountain climbers have an unspoken code: if you can't get down the mountain on your own power, you're not getting down the mountain. Read "Touching the Void" for an intense account of two climbers who come face-to-face with this dilemma)
- Blizzard: there's a danger of getting lost due to blizzard conditions (in which case you're likely to freeze to death)
- Lactic acid build-up in your muscles (which causes severe cramps, especially at high-altitudes where there's less oxygen than at sea-level)
- Cornices which break (a cornice is a snow-packed hump on a ridge. They look solid and sturdy, but that can be a deadly illusion)
- Faulty or lost equipment (broken toe-spikes, boots that aren't water proof, gloves and jackets that don't insulate well enough, oxygen canisters that aren't completely full, ropes that break, caribeners that snap, dropping a pick-ax, losing your gloves, etc.)
- Hyperventilation from over-exertion (which will cause you to use up the oxygen in your cannister at an excelerated rate. This is very dangerous, as when you summit, you NEED that oxygen in order to avoid hypoxia)
- Lost footing resulting in sliding off the face of the mountain
- Insufficient caloric intake which results in lack of energy to get up or down the mountain in due time
- Time constraints (when summiting, climbers are required to turn back if they don't summit by 2 p.m. Pushing it to any later than that is tempting the weather gods. You may not be able to get down the mountain in time to avoid a sudden climatic change...and it happens ALL the time)

That should give you some ideas for your writing. : )
answered Aug 19, 2013 by ccee (307,900 points)
selected Aug 19, 2013 by pance

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